Airports addressing their CO2 emissions

Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Case studies

  • ABIDJAN AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    AERIA (Abidjan International Félix Houphouët-Boigny Airport), with 1,800,000 passengers in 2016, is a principal actor in the development and modernization of the Abidjan Airport. AERIA is exemplary and ambitious concerning the environment protection. The objective of carbon neutrality was achieved through the vision and strategy of the Directorate at its highest level.

    Why did you decide to go for carbon neutrality and what were the business drivers?

    Abidjan Airport is committed to meeting environmental requirements, while maintaining operational excellence. In that respect, AERIA's participation in Airport Carbon Accreditation was the platform to launch a new energy management strategy to reduce emissions and, more broadly, engage in a new way of thinking about the environment. Strategic management actions were carried out to achieve the following objectives:

    • Initial audit (Environment benchmarking)
    • Declaration of an environmental policy
    • Determination of carbon reduction targets
    • Establishment of an internal unit to combat climate change
    • Establishment of a committee dealing with GHG issues, integrating external stakeholders (airline, ATC services, catering, ground handing ...)
    • Implementation of the carbon reduction plan by AERIA and its stakeholders
    What actions / steps did you take to achieve carbon neutrality?

    The critical factor in attaining Level 3+ accreditation for Abidjan Airport was fully understanding, documenting and reducing the airport’s comprehensive carbon footprint, also by involving stakeholders. The following measures have been taken:

    • Communication on environmental policy and carbon / energy objectives
    • Sensitization of the occupants of the offices (switching off lighting, air conditioning and some appliances during their absence)
    • Installation of presence detectors in toilets for optimal electricity management
    • Conditioning of the air curtain, a means of maintaining the temperature in the public hall of the international terminal
    • Replacement of incandescent lamps with LED bulbs in terminals and VIP lounge
    • Determination of tenants who do not have electricity under meters
    • Install a tracer device on AERIA vehicles
    • Maintenance of automatic controls on other equipment, such as escalators during periods of low activity

    Residual emissions are offset through the purchase of carbon credits approved by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

    How did you engage with your internal and external stakeholders (e.g. management, employees, shareholders, customers, etc.?

    As described above, awareness-raising and education of employees with regard to energy savings play an important role in the airport’s carbon management plan.

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  • GALAPAGOS ECOLOGICAL AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    The Galapagos Ecological Airport ECOGAL S.A., the concessionaire company responsible for the administration and operation of the Seymour Airport of Baltra Island, offers a level of service and comfort to benefit its users, prioritising in their operations the care for the environment and the island's ecosystem.

    Why did you want to participate in the programme?

    ECOGAL, being the first ecological airport in the world, is always looking to improve environmental efficiency in its daily operations, which is why Airport Carbon Accreditation is an opportunity to achieve carbon neutrality and thus to reaffirm our commitment as Ecological Airport in one of the most important natural heritage sites in the world.

    How long has your airport been in the program? If several years, what was your original accreditation level, and have you moved through the levels since then?

    ECOGAL has been part of Airport Carbon Accreditation since 2015, originally joining at Level 1 Mapping, using 2014 as a baseline year. Since then, it has adopted a policy of greater commitment to the environment, achieving Level 2 Reduction in 2016. We are currently working to achieve Level 3 Optimisation.

    What CO2, energy reduction targets / objectives have you set?

    Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from stationary sources by 30% by 2017, compared to 2014 levels. Reduce greenhouse gas emissions from mobile sources by 0.5% per year.

    What key actions have you taken / intend to take to improve energy efficiency / introduce renewable energy technologies?

    ECOGAL has taken several actions to improve its energy efficiency:

    • At the moment the Baltra Airport Terminal has solar panels that are connected to the public network, helping to produce a small percentage of clean energy
    • ECOGAL is in the process of introducing electric vehicles to carry out works at the airport terminal.
    • ECOGAL operates an intelligent lighting system in all of its areas, regulating the amount of lighting based on the use and level of natural light.
    • ECOGAL does not have air conditioning in its public areas.
    Do you have a flagship CO2 emissions reduction project?

    In 2015, the Baltra Airport Terminal carried out a project that allowed connecting wind energy to the public grid, helping to reduce the consumption of fuel, by no longer depending on electric generators to supply the daily operations of the terminal. This allowed the reduction of CO2 emissions by more than 30%, compared to 2014.

    What benefits does accreditation bring you?
    • Better control of the use of airport resources, such as petrol, diesel and electricity.
    • Increased environmental awareness of staff working in ECOGAL, as well as by concessionaires who provide their services within the airport terminal.
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  • DELHI AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    Located in India’s capital city, Delhi Airport is being operated, managed and developed by Delhi International Airport Ltd (DIAL), a joint venture consortium of GMR Group, Airports Authority of India (AAI) and Fraport AG. Delhi Airport was ranked the 21st largest airport in the world in 2016, serving over 57 million passengers, and is the busiest airport in India. The airport is consistently recognized as one of the world’s top facilities, having been recently rated as the second best airport in customer experience by Airports Council International (ACI). In 2016, Delhi became the first airport in the Asia-Pacific region to reach the carbon neutral status of Airport Carbon Accreditation.

    Why did you decide to go for carbon neutrality and what were the business drivers?

    While representing the International Aviation Community in Lima to Paris Action Agenda (LPAA) at COP21 in Paris, Mr. Indana Prabhakara Rao, CEO of DIAL, voiced his intention to develop sustainable solutions to the impact aviation has on climate, by pursuing Level 3+ Neutrality of Airport Carbon Accreditation. The main drivers of Delhi being a carbon neutral airport are:

    • Meeting the expectations of Government of India towards meeting its Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) commitments
    • Creating a leadership role and awareness on climate change and “carbon neutrality”
    • Creating a sustainable airport operation model
    • Significant cost savings related to operating expenses
    • Overall airport system and process efficiency improvement through effective monitoring and GHG management program
    What actions / steps did you take to achieve carbon neutrality?

    DIAL embarked on the journey of GHG management in the year 2010, by setting up a mission of GHG management, strategic objectives and initiatives, well defined Key Performance Indicators (KPI) for each function, followed by continuous monitoring, periodic review and benchmarking process. DIAL has continuously adopted the global best practices in terms of process optimization, enhanced operational efficiency and resource conservation to reduce GHG emissions without compromising on the quality of service delivered as an airport operator. The GHG mitigation initiatives of Delhi Airport are:

    RESULTS

    The effective GHG management program has resulted in significant reduction of emissions, both in terms of specific and absolute emissions. Delhi Airport has reduced more than 60% specific GHG emissions (kg CO2/pax) since 2010-11 as compared to 2016-17. This is a significant achievement considering passenger, ATM and cargo volumes have increased significantly during this period, which impacts the “variable energy” consumption of the airport which is “throughput” dependent. Besides, new infrastructure has also been put in place during this period.

    FUTURE ROAD MAP

    Airport Carbon Accreditation is a highly systematic and action-oriented approach, provided by Airports Council International (ACI). It has enabled Delhi Airport to effectively measure, monitor and improve its GHG management performance. DIAL is committed to continue its journey towards becoming a green and sustainable airport, through deployment of long-term strategy and actions. The long-term “neutrality” ambition of DIAL is based on the following six pillars:

    How did you engage with your internal and external stakeholders (e.g. management, employees, shareholders, customers, etc.)?

    As described above, the airport has involved a wide range of stakeholders in its carbon management activities, including airlines in relation to FEGPU and PCA, as well as through A-CDM, but also providers of surface access service, by supporting public transport connections with the airport. These projects are underpinned by training and awareness-raising initiatives.

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  • MARSEILLE PROVENCE AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    Marseille Provence Airport is the fifth biggest airport in France with 8.5 million passengers. We are aware that our activity has an impact on climate change. That’s why we are aiming to develop our activity, while reducing our environmental impact.

    Why did you want to participate in the programme?

    To be proactive and show that we don’t wait for legislation to engage actions. Marseille Provence Airport started to reduce its energy consumption before joining Airport Carbon Accreditation. For instance, with 36 GWh in 2013, the airport managed to reduce its electricity consumption to the same level as 2005, while there was an increase of 3 million passengers. However, we wanted to participate in the programme in order to promote our actions, and translate them in term of CO2 emissions and not only KWh.

    How long has your airport been in the programme? If several years, what was your original accreditation level, and have you moved through the levels since then?

    How long: 4 years
    Original accreditation level: Level 1 in 2014
    2016: Level 2
    Objective for 2018: Level 3

    What CO2, energy reduction targets / objectives have you set?

    Reduce our GHG emissions by 10 % and 20 % by 2020 and 2025 respectively compared to 2010

    What key actions have you taken / intend to take to improve energy efficiency / introduce renewable energy technologies?

    • Reduce our generator usage (generators are only used in case of problems)
    • Substitute the original indoor lights by LED
    • Install meters on equipment in order to better know our energy consumption usages
    • Refurbishment of our Air Handling Units
    • Develop 400 Hz on the platform
    • Develop buses and train connections from/to the airport
    • Communication and staff awareness
    • Subscribe by 2018 to a contract where 100 % of our electricity consumption is provided by renewable sources
    Do you have a flagship CO2 emissions reduction project?

    Development of 400 Hz on Terminal 2

    What benefits does accreditation bring you

    It allows us to support the development of more energy efficient projects and it allows us to show the numerous benefits of our actions and to promote them.

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  • MONTREAL PIERRE-ELLIOTT-TRUDEAU AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    Montréal Pierre-Elliott-Trudeau International Airport is the main passenger airport in Quebec and third in Canada. With 16.6 million passengers in 2016, Montréal-Trudeau Airport connects directly to nearly 140 destinations offered by 32 carriers. Since 2008, the terminal building is accredited BOMA BEST, attesting to the excellence in energy and environmental performance of the building.

    Why did you want to participate in the programme?

    As part of its ISO 14001 certification, Aéroports de Montréal (ADM) has been performing annual inventories of GHG emissions since 2007. We had set a reduction objective and we already had implemented several measures to reduce the airport’s carbon footprint. Our participation in the Airport Carbon Accreditation programme was thus a natural next step to what was already implemented at the airport. The programme shows our Management Committee’s willingness and commitment to protect the environment. We are honoured to be the first Canadian airport accredited and to challenge other airports to join the programme. Through this programme, we demonstrate our environmental leadership among North American airports and the community.

    How long has your airport been in the programme? If several years, what was your original accreditation level, and have you moved through the levels since then?

    In December 2014, Montréal-Trudeau has become the first Canadian airport and the second one in North America to be certified Level 2 under the Airport Carbon Accreditation standard.
    In December 2016, ADM has been recognized for its commitment to reducing greenhouse gases in collaboration with its various partners at Montréal-Trudeau Airport with a certificate at Level 3 (Optimisation).

    What CO2, energy reduction targets / objectives have you set?

    ADM has set a GHG emissions target to reach by 2020: to produce 5% lower emissions, than in 2013.

    What key actions have you taken / intend to take to improve energy efficiency / introduce renewable energy technologies?

    The many initiatives targeting CO2 emissions’ reductions include the airport’s ultra-high-performance thermal plant, designed for energy recovery. This one-of-a-kind facility, powered mainly by electricity and natural gas, has driven significant gains in energy efficiency and reduction of emissions since 2003. ADM also developed, in collaboration with Concordia University and the company Somfy, an ingenious automated window-shade system, that keeps natural light at optimum levels in the terminal. Other systems targeting similar energy efficiency goals include LED lighting on runways, taxiways and airport roads, as well as variable-speed escalators and moving sidewalks. In addition, all boarding bridges are equipped with electric power units and cool- or hot-air conduits to supply parked aircraft, avoiding use of on-board power units, which burn fossil fuels. Many initiatives at Montréal–Trudeau measure the commitment of third parties to reducing GHG emissions. These include the use of more energy efficient equipment by airlines, such as preconditioned-air (PCA) and ground power units (GPU), the “greening” of half the taxi fleet, the addition of charging stations for electric vehicles, the introduction of the Téo electric-taxi service, and the setting up of CellParc, a waiting area for motorists with cell phones, coming to the airport to pick up passengers. Environmental awareness campaigns with airport employees, and the Écono-Écolo-Pratique program, designed to increase the use of public transit, are other initiatives that were taken into account. A green roof and a living wall have embellished the terminal and contributed to the environmental performance of the building.

    Do you have a flagship CO2 emissions reduction project?

    High performance thermal plant and unique HVAC system that is especially designed to recover energy and redistribute the hot or cold air in the air flows inside the terminal

    What benefits does accreditation bring you?

    This accreditation is a key element for our employees’ mobilization toward the implementation and development of energy efficiency initiatives and projects. We are proud to join an international initiative and be recognized by the industry among the best.

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  • NADI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    Airports Fiji Limited owns and operates Nadi International Airport and manages Nausori Airport and 13 other domestic, outer island airports on behalf of the Fiji Government. AFL also provides Air Traffic Management services in the Nadi Flight Information Region, that includes the air space of Fiji, Tuvalu, New Caledonia, Kiribati and Vanuatu, covering an area of 6.0 million square kilometres.

    Nadi International Airport is Fiji’s main international airport and an important regional hub for the South Pacific Islands. It facilitates 38 scheduled international flights on a daily basis and handles 97% of international passengers to Fiji annually, 86% of which are tourists. Nadi International Airport has become the first airport in the Pacific Island States to receive Airport Carbon Accreditation Level 1 Certification by the Airports Council International.

    Why did you want to participate in the programme?

    Fiji is the first country in the world to formally approve the UN Climate deal agreed by 195 nations in Paris in December 2015. Under its national climate action plan, Fiji has pledged to generate 100% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2030. It has also promised to cut overall emissions from its energy sector (fossil fuels) by 30% by 2030 compared to business as usual, conditional on it receiving climate finance from industrialised nations.
    Our participation in the Airport Carbon Accreditation Programme is of national and international significance, seeing that Fiji assumes the Presidency of COP23 at the headquarters of the UNFCCC Secretariat in Bonn, Germany in order to maintain the momentum of the 2015 Paris Agreement to reduce carbon emissions.

    How long has your airport been in the program? If several years, what was your original accreditation level, and have you moved through the levels since then?

    We have just been in the programme for just over a year and it has been a very exciting and rewarding journey.

    What CO2, energy reduction targets / objectives have you set?

    Airports Fiji Limited has a Carbon Management Policy, that outlines company direction towards reducing carbon emissions. We are working on Level 2 requirements, hence, still in the process of defining specific reduction targets.

    What key actions have you taken / intend to take to improve energy efficiency / introduce renewable energy technologies?

    Airports Fiji Limited (AFL) is the biggest user of electricity in Fiji, spending an average of 2.7 million dollars per year on electricity costs. AFL commenced a terminal modernization project at the Nadi International Airport in July 2013. The Nadi Airport Terminal Modernization Project has resulted in more natural light filtering into our terminal due to structural re-designs. All terminal lighting has been replaced with energy saving LED lights along with sensor activated lights and a new energy efficient chilled water air conditioning system installed. A Building Management System has been implemented to optimally use energy resources within the terminal.
    Additionally, halogen taxiway lighting at taxiways Alpha, Golf and Hotel have been recently replaced by new and approved ICAO LED fixtures. Consideration is in place to install other Airfield lightings to LED fixtures in the near future. Projects that aim to maintain a power factor above 0.90 in order to reduce energy usage and replacement of standard transformers with highly energy efficient transformers are on-going with a target date of end 2017. There are also plans to change all mercury and high pressure sodium streetlights to LED as well. There is a fleet modernization project underway, that is replacing company vehicles with newer fuel efficient vehicles including the aviation fire tenders over the next 5 years.

    The Aurora ATM System in the Nadi ATM Centre is able to process User Preferred Routes (UPR) and Dynamic Airborne Route Planning (DARP), which allows airlines to fly and change to more efficient flight path in-flight, depending on the updated weather models. This allows reduction in overall fuel burn. On the local front, we are partnering with our national airline, Fiji Airways, to develop more efficient arrival and departure procedures with lower track miles and lower fuel burn. ADS-B (Automatic Dependant Surveillance - Broadcast) is a ground and satellite-based technology, that enables aircraft to be accurately tracked in real time by air traffic controllers without the need for conventional Secondary Surveillance Radar (SSR). The introduction of ADS-B will benefit both Airports Fiji Limited and aircraft operators due to improved surveillance coverage, improved traffic flow, reduced fuel costs and reduced infrastructure costs. Airports Fiji Limited has installed eleven ground stations with plans to implement the surveillance control service in 2018. Fiji has mandated fitment of ADS-B equipment on board Fiji registered aircrafts to take advantage of the many benefits that flow from this versatile technology.

    Do you have a flagship CO2 emissions reduction project?

    No, we have a range of projects as described above.

    What benefits does accreditation bring you?

    Carbon accreditation has raised our airport profile. We are proud to be the first airport in the Pacific Island States to be carbon accredited and to be recognised at an international level. It demonstrates to the Pacific and to the world our determination to operate in an environmentally sustainable manner. With our Prime Minister leading the charge as the incoming President of the COP23, we believe that organizations must lead by example and be committed to reducing carbon emissions. Pacific Island nations face the harsh reality of rising sea levels and the impact of climate change is evident with the increasing frequency and ferocity of natural disasters experienced by our own country.

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  • NICE COTE D’AZUR AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    Nice Cote d’Azur airport is the 3rd busiest airport in France with 12 million passengers a year connecting directly to 100 destinations. Located on the French Riviera, the airport has a unique location, as it is situated between the Mediterranean and the Alps and is very close to the city of Nice.

    Why did you decide to go for carbon neutrality and what were the business drivers?

    Nice Cote d’Azur was first accredited under Airport Carbon Accreditation at Level 1 in 2011. Since then, we have progressed through the levels of certification to achieve the highest level of accreditation – Level 3+ Neutrality in 2016, two years ahead of our target, thus becoming the 25th carbon neutral airport in the world.

    Since 2010, a key aim has been to reduce the CO2 emissions from the airport and increase the use of renewable energy. While increasing our passengers by 30%, we have cut our kilograms of CO2 per passenger by 75%, in particular thanks to a successful partnership with Electricité de France and the signature of a contract for the purchase of 100% French hydroelectric power. We have also tested the first fully electric airport shuttle bus with boost charging and introduced an autonomous power and air conditioning supply system for business travel. We have operated on 100% renewable energy since January 2015.

    All these initiatives, aimed at being more energy efficient and reduce our GHG emissions, led us to move to carbon neutrality. Our decision was also in line with the COP21 target of the European airport industry to reach 50 carbon neutral airports by 2030.

    What actions / steps did you take to achieve carbon neutrality?

    We chose to gradually move through the levels of Airport Carbon Accreditation, improving our energy performance over time and learning from our experience. We made our decisions based on facts and future projects to go to the final step toward carbon neutrality.

    To reach neutrality we have chosen offset projects corresponding to our activities, which still need effort in terms of GHG reductions (energy, waste and water). These projects were located in Africa, Asia and France, all recognized by UNFCCC standards.

    How did you engage with your internal and external stakeholders (e.g. management, employees, shareholders, customers, etc.?

    We created a “Club des Partenaires Environnement”, gathering all the companies involved in airport carbon accreditation. Within this club of 38 companies all the different activities that are present on the airport are represented: airlines, ground handling, car rental, shops, administration, freight, security. We share with them our targets, our actions and our expectations.

    We tried to make our employees proud of our commitment to become the first French airport to become carbon neutral.

    We developed communications supporting ecological attitude and featuring key facts about the airport’s actions in order to involve a maximum number of employees.

    Now we feel like a high level sportsman, it’s a team adventure and the biggest challenge ahead is to maintain our Airport Carbon Accreditation level.
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  • SAN DIEGO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    San Diego International Airport (SAN), located in southern California, is the busiest single-runway airport in the United States, serving over 20 million passengers annually. SAN is committed to building an enduring and resilient airport that is business driven, passenger-centred, and community-minded.

    Why did you want to participate in the programme?

    As one of the first US airports to adopt a formal sustainability policy, the San Diego International Airport has been widely recognized for successfully managing its financial, social, and environmental sustainability. As such, SAN has been implementing a variety of policies and projects over the last eight years to proactively reduce its carbon emissions. The Airport Carbon Accreditation program provided a valuable framework to track this progress, while benchmarking our carbon management efforts against other leading airports.

    How long has your airport been in the programme? If several years, what was your original accreditation level, and have you moved through the levels since then?

    SAN officially joined the Airport Carbon Accreditation programme in 2016, when it was certified at Level 2 for successfully managing and reducing its airport-controlled emissions.

    What CO2, energy reduction targets / objectives have you set?

    The San Diego International Airport has been using the State of California’s greenhouse gas reduction milestones of a 15% reduction by 2020 and a 49% reduction by 2035 (compared to 2010), as a guidepost for all airport development projects and other carbon management initiatives. For energy, SAN is also striving to achieve 100% renewable energy and a 30% reduction in energy use intensity by 2035.

    What key actions have you taken / intend to take to improve energy efficiency / introduce renewable energy technologies?

    Since electricity use represents one of the largest contributors of airport-controlled carbon emissions, SAN has invested significant time and resources into transitioning to cleaner energy sources and more efficient technology and operations. Currently, over 44% of SAN’s electricity portfolio is from renewable resources, including 5.5 MW of solar photovoltaic systems across the airport campus connected through a micro-grid. All new facilities are built to surpass state energy efficiency codes, while most existing facilities have been upgraded with energy-saving technologies, such as LEDs with sophisticated lighting controls and variable-frequency drives on pumps and motors.

    Do you have a flagship CO2 emissions reduction project?

    One of SAN’s most successful carbon management initiatives was the creation of a “Ground Transportation Vehicle Conversion Incentive Program”. Launched in 2012, the program provides incentives, through reduced annual permit and trip fees, to commercial ground transportation providers that switch their fleet vehicles to alternate fuel technologies. The program has led to approximately 97% of taxis transitioning to hybrid vehicles and 93% of off-airport parking shuttles using compressed natural gas or propane instead of diesel. Recently, the San Diego International Airport expanded the successful program to include transportation network companies (e.g. Uber), making SAN one of the first airports to begin regulating these ridesharing services’ carbon intensities.

    What benefits does accreditation bring you?

    The San Diego International Airport has received numerous benefits from its participation in the Airport Carbon Accreditation program. First, the programme has created an incredible opportunity to share ideas and lessons learned with other airports, thus helping to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of SAN’s carbon management activities. The programme’s third-party review and verification process also adds credibility to annual emission inventories and reduction reports. Finally, since first joining the Airport Carbon Accreditation programme, the San Diego International Airport has developed a roadmap to eventually achieve carbon neutrality (Level 3+).

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  • SUNSHINE COAST AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    Sunshine Coast Airport (SCA) is located in the heart of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia. SCA is owned and operated by Sunshine Coast Council. In recent years, the activity at the airport has grown substantially with 13% passenger and capacity growth in the 12 months to December 2016, making SCA Australia’s fastest growing airport.

    Why did you decide to go for carbon neutrality and what were the business drivers?

    In March 2017, Sunshine Coast Airport in Queensland became the first Australian airport to achieve Level 3+ Neutrality under the Airports Council International’s Airport Carbon Accreditation programme.

    Joining the programme in 2012, the airport’s journey to neutrality was inspired by Sunshine Coast Council’s vision to be Australia’s most sustainable region. The challenge was embraced by the entire Sunshine Coast Airport team and the airport is now recognised around the globe for leading the way in managing carbon emissions and reducing its carbon footprint.

    What actions/steps did you take to achieve carbon neutrality?

    The journey to the top level of the programme was undertaken with an innovative and holistic approach including the implementation of initiatives that touched all parts of the business; from planning and built form, to energy reduction initiatives, waste management and recycling, to working with airline and commercial partners.

    In 2013, the airport achieved Level 1 Mapping, followed by Level 2 Reduction in 2014 and Level 3 Optimisation in 2016. Since first mapping its carbon usage in 2013, Sunshine Coast Airport’s efforts to reduce its overall carbon footprint have delivered a 24% reduction in Scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions, a 9% reduction in electricity consumption per passenger, an 11% reduction in waste to landfill per passenger, and a 15% reduction in water consumption.

    The airport implemented energy management systems that allowed the business to respond in a more timely manner to customer demand including automation of the air conditioning system to be responsive to flight schedules, installation of large-scale energy efficient fans to create air movement and assist in reducing air conditioning requirements, and examining the built environment to maximise the use of natural light and recyclable materials.

    To significantly reduce the amount of airport waste being sent to landfill the airport installed Australia’s first solar powered On-Site Composting Apparatus (OSCA), fitted three-way bin systems inside the terminal, including compartments for general waste, recyclables and compostable items, and worked with tenants and customers to reduce waste via compostable packaging, plates, cups and wooden cutlery. Water consumption was reduced through a combination of rainwater harvesting and efficiency upgrades including the implementation of urban sensitive land design to substantially reduce the use of irrigation within the airport’s precinct, and the installation of rainwater tanks to harvest water from the terminal roof for use in amenities and landscaping.

    Sunshine Coast Airport also purchased Australian Gold Standard Carbon Offsets to negate residual emissions.

    How did you engage with your internal and external stakeholders (e.g. management, employees, shareholders, customers, etc.?

    Clear and consistent messaging on the social, environmental and business benefits of a reduced carbon footprint have been instrumental in ensuring participation by airline and commercial partners, as well as passengers, on the journey to carbon neutrality.

    Airline and commercial partners were directly engaged in relation to the airport’s capital improvement program and required to invest in technology and process improvements including the reduction of energy consumption and water use.

    Passengers were encouraged to be part of the journey by using new three-way bin systems to increase the percentage of recycling and reduce the amount of waste going to landfill. Signage throughout the terminal informs passengers about carbon reduction initiatives undertaken by Sunshine Coast Airport, including the harvesting of rainwater for use in facilities.

    Sunshine Coast Airport has also proudly included the Airport Carbon Accreditation programme logos on corporate stationery, email signatures, business cards and on the website since joining the programme in 2012.

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  • VIENNA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

    One /two lines about your airport:

    Vienna International Airport is located 18 km southeast of central Vienna and 57 km west of Bratislava and is handling some 22.5 million passengers a year. It is one of the most important hubs for the growing number of destinations in Central and Eastern Europe. Its growth strategy is also based on the positive development of demand for flights to destinations in Asia and the Middle East and the above average expansion of low cost carriers.

    Why did you want to participate in the programme?

    Sustainability and energy efficiency are important corporate goals of Vienna Airport. Airport Carbon Accreditation is a programme exclusively for airports to account for and reduce controllable CO2 emissions at the airport site. It is the only global CO2 reduction programme for airports, that provides recognition of airports’ efforts to control and reduce their carbon emissions.

    How long has your airport been in the programme? If several years, what was your original accreditation level, and have you moved through the levels since then?

    Vienna Airport was certified at Level 1 in 2013. We gained Level 2 certification in 2014 and attained Level 3 in 2016.

    What CO2, energy reduction targets / objectives have you set?

    By 2022, we want to have reduced CO2 emissions by 30% compared to 2012. In the longer term, we want to become a carbon neutral business. For this purpose, investments of up to €30 million in energy efficiency and other carbon reduction measures are planned.

    What key actions have you taken / intend to take to improve energy efficiency / introduce renewable energy technologies?

    Vienna Airport has reduced its CO2 emissions by more than 27% since 2012 and its specific energy consumption per traffic unit by 14.2%. In the period between 2012 to 2016, fuel consumption for airport vehicles was cut by 10.3% and total energy needs fell by 6.6%, despite a 5.7% rise in traffic.

    These outcomes were achieved by first carrying out comprehensive surveys of emissions, including flight and landside traffic and developing company- wide measures to reduce overall CO2 emissions. These surveys were carried out on a wider airport basis, and included compilation of CO2 emissions in the LTO cycle, CO2 emissions from aircraft engine test runs and third party ground handling, as well as the entire electricity procurement of the airport (including lease holders and other on - site companies, as well as the entire landside traffic). Also, improvements in energy efficiency were achieved by converting lighting and air conditioning systems, optimizing the transmission grids and investing in the vehicle fleet, so that it will be electric powered and natural gas driven by 2020. The changeover from diesel driven to 30 electric powered catering forklift trucks will enable us to save about 275,000 litres of diesel each year.

    Do you have a flagship CO2 emissions reduction project?

    In 2016, two photovoltaic plants with more than 2,000 solar modules on a total area of 3,200 square metres were put into operations, generating more than 500,000 kWh of solar electricity each year. Another photovoltaic plant will come on stream in 2017 on the roof of the cargo centre on an area of around 5,000 square metres, making it one of the largest photovoltaic facilities in Austria.

    What benefits does accreditation bring you?

    Airport Carbon Accreditation has helped us to extensively reduce our CO2 emissions and to demonstrate that it is possible for an airport to be economically successful and simultaneously cut costs and energy consumption. It has pushed us to set a goal of becoming a completely CO2 neutral flight hub.

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